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Comorbidities elevate risks of death by Covid-19

Comorbidities elevate risks of death by Covid-19

Obesity-associated comorbidities such as heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure increase the likelihood of severe Covid-19 infection and mortality.

Lifestyle diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, and hypertension, increase risks of severe Covid-19 illness and death, warns the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (1). According to an article published in Diabetes Care, patients with heart disease are 10.5% more likely, patients with diabetes are 7.3% more likely, and patients with hypertension are 6% more likely to die from severe Covid-19 symptoms, compared to the general population (2).

Patients with heart disease are more likely to contract severe Covid-19 symptoms because a combination of the virus and cardiovascular problems increases demands on the heart, reduces oxygen levels, and elevates the propensity for blood clots. Patients with diabetes and hypertension are also more likely to succumb to Covid-19 because both conditions impair immune responses, making it difficult for the body to fight the disease effectively.

Patients with pre-existing conditions can implement measures to prevent contracting Covid-19 by maintaining good hygiene practices and observing social distancing. They can also reduce their risks of Covid-19 by managing their present comorbidities, by adopting healthy lifestyle changes involving regular exercise and healthy diets, as well as through assistive pharmacological interventions such as Labeesity.

References:

1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, People with Certain Medical Conditions, (2021). Accessible at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html (Last accessed: 19 March 2021)
2) Riddle, M., Buse, J., Franks, M., et al. COVID-19 in People With Diabetes: Urgently Needed Lessons From Early Reports. Diabetes Care, 2020;43(7): 1378-1381. Accessible at: https://doi.org/10.2337/dci20-0024 (Last accessed: 19 March 2021)